The report, published in the medical journal BMJ Open, analyzed 4 million people born between 1891 and 2001 and found that, historically, men were more likely to drink alcohol, and in amounts that would damage their health.
Now, women are catching up, especially in more recent generations.
Early in the 20th century, men were more than twice as likely to drink than women and more than three times as likely to develop alcohol-related problems. But today, the two genders are about equal: Men born since the 1980s are only 1.1 times more likely to drink than than their female counterparts and 1.3 times more likely to consume alcohol in a way that is considered problematic.
women-drinking
The results came from the analysis of 68 international studies published between 1980 and 2014. The researchers grouped people by birth date to look at levels of alcohol consumption. Researchers looked at any use, including quantities and frequency, problematic uses such as binge drinking or heavy drinking, and the prevalence of associated problems.
“There had been several reports of sex convergence regarding alcohol consumption, but nobody had confirmed that, which is why we decided to look over global studies published throughout the years to see if we could prove that there had been a shift,” said researcher Katherine M. Keyes, an associate professor of epidemiology at Columbia University.
The study did not test why the gap is closing between men and women when it comes to alcohol, but researchers noted that changing traditional gender roles for women could be one explanation.